Skip to content Skip to sidebar Skip to footer

6 Beautiful Ornamental Plants with Names

Ornamental plants are plants that are grown for decorative purposes. Some common types of ornamental plants include:

Annuals: These plants have a lifespan of one growing season and must be replanted every year. Examples include marigolds, zinnias, and petunias.

Perennials: These plants come back year after year and typically die back to the ground in the fall. Examples include daisies, black-eyed susans, and hostas.

Bulbs: These plants have a dormant underground stem that stores food, and they can be planted in the fall for spring blooming, such as tulips, daffodils, and crocus.

Shrubs: These are woody plants that are typically smaller than trees and have multiple stems. Examples include azaleas, hydrangeas, and rhododendrons.

Trees: These are woody plants that have a single stem and can grow to be quite tall. Examples include oak trees, maple trees, and cherry trees.

Additionally, some ornamental plants are grown for their foliage, like hostas, and some for their bark, like the coral bark maple.


Annuals

Annual plants are those that complete their entire life cycle, from seed to flower to seed, within one growing season. They are often used in gardening and landscaping for their colorful blooms and versatility in design.

The use of annual plants in gardening dates back to ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, who used annuals in their gardens for both practical and decorative purposes. In the Middle Ages, monks and nuns cultivated annual plants in monastic gardens for both medicinal and ornamental purposes.

During the Victorian era (1837-1901), annual plants became increasingly popular in Europe and North America as a way to add color to gardens, and new techniques such as bedding out, using annuals in mass plantings, were developed.

In the 20th century, breeding techniques improved, and new annual plants, such as marigolds, petunias, and zinnias, became available in a wide range of colors and sizes. This made annual plants an even more popular choice for gardeners and landscapers.

Nowadays, annual plants are widely used in gardening, landscaping, and horticulture industry to provide instant color and fill in gaps in perennial gardens, as well as in window boxes, hanging baskets, and other container gardens.


Perennials

Perennial plants are those that live for more than two growing seasons and typically die back to the ground in the fall before regrowing the following spring. They are often used in gardening and landscaping for their long-lasting blooms and their ability to fill in gaps in the garden.

The use of perennial plants in gardening dates back to ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, who used perennials in their gardens for both practical and decorative purposes. They were also cultivated by monks and nuns in monastic gardens for medicinal and ornamental purposes.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, the popularity of perennial plants increased in Europe and North America, as they were seen as a more naturalistic and romantic addition to gardens, compared to the more formal and structured use of annuals. This led to the development of the "perennial border", a type of garden bed that is planted with a mixture of different perennial plants.

In the 20th century, the breeding and introduction of new perennial varieties, such as hostas, daylilies, and black-eyed susans, made them even more popular among gardeners and landscapers. These new varieties offered a wider range of colors, sizes, and blooming seasons.

Nowadays, perennials are widely used in gardening, landscaping, and horticulture industry to provide long-lasting color and texture to gardens, and to create continuity in the landscape. They are also popular for their low maintenance and the ability to come back year after year.


Bulbs

Bulbs are underground storage structures that contain the food and energy a plant needs to grow and flower. They are often used in gardening and landscaping for their ability to provide early spring color and for their ease of planting and care.

The use of bulbs in gardening dates back to ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, who used bulbs in their gardens for both practical and decorative purposes. Bulbs were also cultivated by monks and nuns in monastic gardens for medicinal and ornamental purposes.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, the popularity of bulbs increased in Europe and North America, as they were seen as a reliable way to provide early spring color in gardens. This led to the development of bulb catalogs and the introduction of new bulb varieties from other parts of the world.

In the 20th century, breeding and hybridization techniques improved, and new varieties of bulbs, such as tulips, daffodils, and crocuses, became available in a wide range of colors and sizes. This made bulbs an even more popular choice for gardeners and landscapers.

Nowadays, bulbs are widely used in gardening, landscaping, and horticulture industry to provide early spring color and to fill in gaps in gardens, as well as in window boxes, hanging baskets, and other container gardens. Bulbs are also popular for their ease of planting and care, as they only need to be planted once, and they will come back year after year.


Shrubs

Shrubs are woody plants that are typically smaller than trees and have multiple stems. They are often used in gardening and landscaping for their ability to provide year-round interest, structure and to create a naturalistic look in the garden.

The use of shrubs in gardening dates back to ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, who used shrubs in their gardens for both practical and decorative purposes. Shrubs were also cultivated by monks and nuns in monastic gardens for medicinal and ornamental purposes.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, the popularity of shrubs increased in Europe and North America, as they were seen as a more naturalistic and romantic addition to gardens, compared to the more formal and structured use of annuals and perennials. This led to the development of the "shrubbery" a type of garden bed that is planted with a mixture of different shrubs.

In the 20th century, the breeding and introduction of new shrub varieties, such as azaleas, hydrangeas, and rhododendrons, made them even more popular among gardeners and landscapers. These new varieties offered a wider range of colors, sizes, and blooming seasons.

Nowadays, shrubs are widely used in gardening, landscaping, and horticulture industry to provide year-round interest, structure, and to create a naturalistic look in the garden. They are also popular for their low maintenance and the ability to provide privacy and wind protection.


Trees

Trees are woody plants that have a single stem and can grow to be quite tall. They are often used in gardening and landscaping for their ability to provide shade, beauty, and structure to a landscape.

The use of trees in gardening and landscaping dates back to ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, who used trees in their gardens for both practical and decorative purposes. Trees were also cultivated by monks and nuns in monastic gardens for medicinal and ornamental purposes.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, the popularity of trees increased in Europe and North America, as they were seen as a more naturalistic and romantic addition to gardens, and as a way to create large-scale landscaping projects. This led to the development of the "park-like" garden, which featured large lawns and well-spaced trees.

In the 20th century, the introduction of new tree varieties, such as Japanese maples, Dogwood, and redbuds, made them even more popular among gardeners and landscapers. These new varieties offered a wider range of colors, sizes, and blooming seasons.

Nowadays, trees are widely used in gardening, landscaping, and horticulture industry to provide shade, beauty, and structure to a landscape, as well as to create privacy and wind protection. They are also used for their ecological benefits like cleaning the air, providing habitat for wildlife, and protecting soil from erosion.


Aglaonema

Aglaonema is a genus of tropical perennial plants in the arum family, Araceae. They are native to Southeast Asia, specifically to the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Aglaonemas are known for their attractive, glossy leaves and tolerance of low light conditions, which make them popular houseplants.

The use of Aglaonema as a houseplant dates back to the 19th century. They were first introduced to Europe and North America as ornamental plants in the late 19th century and early 20th century. The first recorded introduction of Aglaonema in the United States was in 1890, but it was not widely grown until the early 20th century.

In the 20th century, breeding and hybridization of Aglaonema species led to the introduction of new varieties, with different leaf colors and patterns, such as Aglaonema 'Silver Queen', which is one of the most popular cultivars. This made Aglaonema an even more popular choice among gardeners and landscapers.

Nowadays, Aglaonemas are widely used as indoor plants and popular in the horticulture industry due to their ability to tolerate low light and humidity, and their attractive foliage. They are also popular as office plants, and in hotels and commercial spaces.

Post a Comment for "6 Beautiful Ornamental Plants with Names"